News and Views

Freed British Guantanamo Bay prisoner awarded £1million compensation after legal fight led by Jihadi John apologists CAGE is held over terror killing

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  • Jamal Kiyemba, arrested over killing of Uganda’s top female prosecutor
  • The 36-year-old Ugandan national grew up in London from age 14  
  • Arrested in Pakistan in 2002 and held at Guantanamo Bay until 2006
  • After his release he claimed he had admitted to terrorism under torture 
  • Awarded £1m compensation over human rights abuse claims

A former Guantanamo Bay prisoner arrested over the terrorist killing of a top female prosecutor in Uganda had been awarded £1million in compensation by the British government following his release.

Jamal Kiyemba, 36, was detained in the Ugandan capital Kampala in connection with the death of Joan Kagezi, who was killed in front of her children days before a major trial against Islamist terror network Al-Shabaab.

Kiyemba, a former pharmacy student at a university in Leicester, who grew up in London, was held at Guantanamo Bay for four years and awarded the huge payout after being released.

Arrested: Ex-Guantanamo Bay prisoner Jamal Kiyemba, 36, a former Leicester University student, was detained in Kampalaover the brutal murder of top female prosecutor Joan Kagezi

Arrested: Ex-Guantanamo Bay prisoner Jamal Kiyemba, 36, a former Leicester University student, was detained in Kampalaover the brutal murder of top female prosecutor Joan Kagezi

The 36-year-old is one of 16 former Guantanamo prisoners awarded a £20million payout from the British taxpayer over claims of false imprisonment and human rights abuse.
His case was championed by Muslim human rights group CAGE, whose director infamously branded ISIS executioner Mohammed ‘Jihadi John’ Emwazi an ‘extremely gentle, kind, beautiful young man’.

He was born in Uganda as Anthony Kiyemba, but converted to Islam aged 20, changing his name to Jamal Abdullah.

When the family arrived in Britain following the death of his father in 1993, Kiyemba, then 14, was granted indefinite leave to remain, but never applied for British citizenship.

Kiyemba was arrested near Peshawar in Pakistan in March 2002, after allegedly trying to enter Afghanistan in the company of ‘a probable al-Qaeda operative, a suspected al-Qaeda operative and a low-level jihadist’, U.S. military files reveal.

Kiyemba, however, claims he had gone to Pakistan to study Arabic and the Koran because the country was ‘very cheap’.

Following his 2006 release, he claimed he had only admitted to terrorist activities under torture by American intelligence officers and that he had been interrogated by MI5.

He was held at Guantanamo Bay for four years but as he was not a British citizen, he was not entitled to representation by the Foreign Office nor, on his release, to automatic rights to return to his family.

Kiyemba, whose mother, four brothers and sister all live in Britain, was instead deported to Uganda, but made several attempts to be allowed back into the UK.

‘I may not be British according to some bit of paper but in reality I am a Brit and always will be,’ he said in an interview following his release.

‘My doctor, my local mosque, my teens, my education, employment, friends, taxes, home and above all else my family – it is all in Britain.’

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