Technology and Science

Russian New Armata T-14 tank ahead of the West – and it WON’T blow up ‘like its predecessor’

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It’s 20 years ahead of the West – and it WON’T blow up ‘like its predecessor’: Brains behind Russia’s new robotic tank reveals secrets of machine at centre of $500BILLION military upgrade

  • New Armata T-14 tank was unveiled at Victory Day parade in Russia last month as part of muscle-flexing exercise
  • Now designers have revealed features including sensor to knock incoming shells of target and improved armour
  • Also claim the war machine has the capability to become fully automated – making it the world’s first robotic tank
  • Armata is part of £250billion military update in Russia which has seen defence spending jump 33 per cent

Bristling with state of the art weaponry, armed with a remote control turret, and equipped with outer armour that explodes on impact to stop shells reaching the crew inside – this is the new Russian tank that its makers claim is 20 years ahead of anything in the West.

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The Armata T-14 tank, produced as part of Russia’s £250billion military update programme, even has the capability to become completely automated – making it the first fully robotic tank in the world.

The war machine was among the new vehicles unveiled by Putin at Russia’s Victory Day parade in Moscow last month, a muscle-flexing exercise designed to boost patriotism among Russians, and intimidate the country’s opponents.

Speaking about the new tank, Viktor Murakhovsky, a retired army colonel who is now the editor of the Arsenal Otechestva military magazine, said the Armata represented a huge leap forward in Russian design, but also came at a huge cost.

He said: ‘The Armata is significantly more expensive than the current models. But it far excels all Russian and foreign tanks on the cost-efficiency basis.’

Terlikov’s deputy, 35-year old Ilya Demchenko, said that the onboard computer system performs most of the technical functions, allowing the crew to focus on key tasks. ‘For the crew, it’s like playing a video game, taking some final moves and making decisions,’ he said.

De Larrinaga agreed that the Armata represented a technological advance for Russia.

‘The crew has a much better chance of surviving if the tank is destroyed,’ de Larrinaga said. ‘If you look at old Russian tank designs, they had a habit of blowing up quite spectacularly with pretty poor chances for crew survivability.’

The previous Russian tank, the T-90, was designed to have a low profile, light armour, and to be extremely manoeuvrable on the battlefield. It weighed 20 tons less than the American Abrams tank, but that meant it was also extremely vulnerable if hit by high-explosive rounds.

By comparison, the new Armata T-14 has a high ground clearance and increased armour, especially on the tank’s traditionally soft underbelly in order to protect the crew from mines.

The Russian government also claim it is protected by a shield of high-tech weaponry, including sensors which can detect incoming rounds, then automatically fire countermeasures to knock them off target.

If these systems work, then it puts the Russians at least a generation ahead in terms of defensive technology, as such systems are only in their infancy on British and American tanks.

MODULAR DESIGN The new tank is part of a family of new armored vehicles built on a unified platform that has a structure based on replaceable modules. This helps lower production costs and leaves room for further development. The Armata family includes a heavy armored infantry vehicle that offers the same level of protection as the tank, and various support machines. SUPERIOR PROTECTION The Armata uses a new type of armor, which designers say is significantly more resistant to enemy fire, although they are coy about its specific characteristics. On top of that, the vehicle is protected by an improved version of reactive armor, which explodes on impact to stop a projectile from reaching the main layer of armor. The Armata is also equipped with a so-called active protection system, forming an outer perimeter of its defenses. When the system spots an enemy projectile, it fires a round to destroy it or knock it off its path. SUPER CANNON The current version of the Armata is equipped with standard-caliber 125-mm cannon, similar to those used on current tanks, which can fire both regular shells and rockets. Designers say that a much more powerful 152-mm cannon could be easily fitted to the Armata in the future - although they say there is no need for that yet. Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3121195/20-years-ahead-West-WON-T-blow-like-predecessor-Brains-Russia-s-new-robotic-tank-reveals-secrets-machine-forefront-country-s-250BILLION-military-modernisation.html#ixzz3cwrZyg7t Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

MODULAR DESIGN
The new tank is part of a family of new armored vehicles built on a unified platform that has a structure based on replaceable modules. This helps lower production costs and leaves room for further development.
The Armata family includes a heavy armored infantry vehicle that offers the same level of protection as the tank, and various support machines.
SUPERIOR PROTECTION
The Armata uses a new type of armor, which designers say is significantly more resistant to enemy fire, although they are coy about its specific characteristics. On top of that, the vehicle is protected by an improved version of reactive armor, which explodes on impact to stop a projectile from reaching the main layer of armor.
The Armata is also equipped with a so-called active protection system, forming an outer perimeter of its defenses. When the system spots an enemy projectile, it fires a round to destroy it or knock it off its path.
SUPER CANNON
The current version of the Armata is equipped with standard-caliber 125-mm cannon, similar to those used on current tanks, which can fire both regular shells and rockets.
Designers say that a much more powerful 152-mm cannon could be easily fitted to the Armata in the future – although they say there is no need for that yet.
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3121195/20-years-ahead-West-WON-T-blow-like-predecessor-Brains-Russia-s-new-robotic-tank-reveals-secrets-machine-forefront-country-s-250BILLION-military-modernisation.html#ixzz3cwrZyg7t
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

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