Health, fitness and Food

Sex in Pregnancy

By  | 

Should pregnancy put a damper on your sex life? On your first pregnancy it is quite normal for you to worry about whether having sex could provoke a miscarriage or damage the baby. Sex is not harmful to the foetus, it is safely cushioned in the womb.

On your first pregnancy it is quite normal for you and your partner to worry about whether having sex could provoke a miscarriage or damage the baby. This can make you nervous and sometimes put you off sex altogether.

Sex is not harmful to the foetus, it is safely cushioned in the womb and even an orgasm won't rock its world!

There are circumstances where your doctor may advise you to limit your sexual activity – if you have had some bleeding or if you have placenta praevia, for example.

As your pregnancy continues and you get bigger you may start to feel very unsexy and worry that your partner doesn't find you attractive. Make sure he reassures you long and often!

On top of these worries there are your hormones, many women find that they lose interest in sex completely in the first trimester. Hardly surprising when they are feeling sick and tired a lot of the time!

Libido may come back with a 'bang' in the second trimester when a lot of women find they have more energy and are feeling less worried and more relaxed.

In the final trimester you may lose interest again and your growing stomach often makes it awkward to find a comfortable position. Many couples find this a challenge and enjoy the opportunity to experiment with different positions; others just enjoy cuddles and intimacy until after the birth.

Some couples turn to sex towards the end of pregnancy or if their baby is overdue, often after a very hot curry!

No, it's not just an old wives tale – sex can induce labour! Semen contains prostaglandin which helps to soften and dilate the cervix, preparing it for labour if you are near delivery time.

Nipple stimulation can also bring on contractions by releasing the hormone oxytocin which can lead to the start of labour.

 

Ask the expert for all your health questions to be answered, either privately or published in the Promota.
Send your questions to  info@thepromota.co.uk

You must be logged in to post a comment Login

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.